Lifestyle, Diet, Vitamins, Herbal & OTC topics

  • New Dietary Guidelines for 2020-2025 – “Making Every Bite Count” is the theme of these recommendations released on 29Dec2020. Content is chock full of helpful links and downloadable resources
  • Vitamin D & COVID-19: How Vitamin D Works and Why Is It So Important? Can You Get More Vitamin D from Sun? – High level content, Very well-explained, Complete with scientific references
    • Update: Warning issued re use of Vit D in COVID - Very high doses of vitamin D [10,000 IU daily] caused kidney damage in a person who wasn't deficient in the vitamin. More recently, a news report on the US-based WHIO-TV website said Charles Opperman, MD, who runs a private medical practice in Washington Township, Ohio, had a COVID-19 patient who was hospitalized for excess vitamin D consumption. "He attempted to treat it himself and that did not go very well," Opperman said. "High calcium levels can lead to confusion, kidney stones, and ultimately hospitalization in this situation."
  • Are metabolically healthy obese individuals really healthy? Guidelines for obesity treatment should consider distinct obesity sub-phenotypes such as the distinction between MHO and metabolically high-risk obesity for a stratification of therapeutic strategies. European Journal of Endocrinology 2014
  • Effect of Marine Omega-3 Fatty Acid and Vitamin D Supplementation on Incident Atrial Fibrillation – Among adults aged 50 years or older, treatment with EPA-DHA or vitamin D3, compared with placebo, resulted in no significant difference in the risk of incident AF over a median follow-up of more than 5 years. The findings do not support the use of either agent for the primary prevention of incident AF. JAMA 16March2021
  • Type of Diet (protein choice) & Risk of CV Disease: Using meat-eaters as a reference group, fish-only eaters have a lower risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes & incidence. A combination fish/poultry diet showed no difference in either measure. Vegetarian diets showed a slight decrease in incidence only, but no difference in outcomes or in type of CV event including heart failure, stroke, myocardial infarction (heart attack) and ischemic heart disease. Meat-only eaters did have a higher incidence of obesity which may influence the results. European Heart Journal 21March2021
  • Association of Major Dietary Protein Sources With All‐Cause and Cause‐Specific Mortality: Prospective large prospective cohort study of 102 521 women followed for 18 years on average found that intake of plant protein, and substitution of animal protein with plant protein, were associated with lower risk of all‐cause, CVD, and dementia mortality. The associations were independent of age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, dietary and lifestyles factors, baseline disease status, and family history of diseases. Furthermore, the investigators identified nuts as potential healthier alternatives for red meat, eggs, dairy products, and legumes. These findings support the need for consideration of protein sources, in addition to the amount of protein intake, in future dietary guidelines – Journal of the American Heart Association JAHA 2021
  • Plant-based VS Keto diets - Findings suggest benefits to both diets, at least in the short term. The low-fat, plant-based diet helps curb appetite, while the animal-based, low-carb diet results in lower and more steady insulin and glucose levels. Note that the study was not designed to make diet recommendations for weight loss, and the results might have been different had the participants been actively trying to lose weight. Also needed is a standard definition of what constitutes 'low-carb' so that studies can be designed and evaluated in a consistent manner. The 'diet tribe' researchers (keto vs plant-based) always seem to find the answer that is in their own favor. Important is that in the real world, most people don't adhere to these very strict diets ― not even for 2 weeks. It is uncertain which diet might be better for an individual. This study proves, rather than chooses, that there are positives and negatives for both diets, - Published in Nature 21Jan2021
  • More From Look AHEAD: Lifestyle Intervention May Up CVD Risk in Some - Randomization Intensive Lifestyle Intervention (ILI) was associated with a greater than 32% increased risk for each cardiovascular outcome only among the poor-glucose-control subgroup. Among the three other diabetes subgroups, ILI was not associated with increased risk for CVD. Diabetes subgroups may be important to identify the patients who would achieve benefit and avoid harm from an ILI. From Diabetes Care Feb2021
  • Intermittent fasting with a focus on Cardiometabolic risk factors – Informative video presentation sponsored by the National Lipid Association. Compares and contrasts various Intermittent fasting protocols to one another and also to other dietary and weight loss regimens as well as to traditional caloric restriction